Tag Archives: Tattoos on the Heart

Public Display of Affection

“But it was love, after all, that made the cross salvific, not the sheer torture of it.” – Gregory Boyle, Tattoos on the Heart

This year at Calvary, as we remember Holy Week, we are reflecting on the words of Mark’s gospel.  It was Mark who recorded that the crucifixion of Jesus began at the third hour (Mark 15:25) and, as a side note, we also know from Matthew’s account that it lasted until the ninth hour (Matthew 27:46).  Six hours is a long time to do anything: imagine being invited to attend the screening of a six-hour movie or enjoy a six-hour buffet; think about babysitting a three-year old for six hours or waiting for news from the ER staff for six hours.  These feats of endurance are nothing compared to what Jesus endured on the cross.

Crucifixion was a particularly ghastly method of capital punishment.  As was the case with Jesus, the victim was tied or nailed to a large wooden beam and left to hang until eventual death from exhaustion and asphyxiation.  Eventually the victim would slump due to muscular fatigue and the diaphragm would compress the lungs, depriving the vital organs of oxygen.  This macabre ‘dance’ – lifting the body with the arms and legs to breathe until they could no longer support the weight and collapse again – went on for hours, and sometimes, to speed up the process, the ones responsible for guarding the condemned would break their legs.

But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.  Romans 5:8

To paraphrase the words of apostle Paul:  God, in Christ, showed us the extent of his love through his death.  The fact is that thousands of people were humiliated and horribly executed by means of a cross, and none of those deaths, in and of themselves, save us from our sin.  The cross is what we call the instrument of death, but it is not its cause.  The cause of Jesus’ death was love, willful, active and limitless love.  He chose to endure the dehumanization and shameful humiliation of crucifixion  (after all, he could have been executed at any time and in any age of human history) to fulfill the will of the Father, to serve as a sacrificial substitute for our sin, and in so doing expressed his love.

I would like to say that there are a few things lasting six hours that I would do for a loved one.  I would like to say that I would wait in the wind and rain, dig a mile-long trench or drive through a blizzard.  I would like to say that, but I am not sure I would do that.  I cannot imagine the great love required to endure the cross for six hours, let alone six minutes.  I cannot fully comprehend how much Jesus loves a sinner like me.  But I can appreciate it.  In my mind, I can picture myself at the foot of the cross, staring up at my suffering savior; I ask him, “How much do you love me?” and with arms outstretched, he replies, “This much!”

Remember to remember Him this Good Friday.

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