Tag Archives: sacrifice

Not Good But Great

“You can’t teach an old dog new tricks.”  These words, first spoken by John Heywood in 1546 and considered the oldest idiom in the English language, may not be true; they do, however express my reality.  Nothing I have gleaned from my seminary education or my more than twenty years of pastoral experience has prepared me for ministry during a pandemic.  I am finding that I have been forced to ‘master’ a number of new skills and, in the process, I am also finding that I am quickly reaching my mental capacity for new processes and programs.  It turns out that I might be an old dog and, while I can learn new tricks, that I might be having trouble performing.

This old dog/new trick paradox rubs raw against my desire to “give of my best to the master.” God deserves our very best, so I want our Sunday morning livestream (which until 4 weeks ago I had no frame of reference for achieving) to go out flawlessly.  I want the YouTube videos (again, no frame of reference) to look professional.  I want my Zoom meetings (I had no idea what zoom was a month ago) to feel like face-to-face meetings.   None of it, honestly, is great: some of what we are producing is passable, at best, and some of it is not.

Maybe you are feeling the same way I am feeling.  Maybe you are sensing that you are not doing anything well.  Maybe there is someone reading this that is thinking that changing from PJs into sweats was your only accomplishment today (let me be the first to say, “GOOD FOR YOU!”).  Allow me to offer you a word of encouragement: you are doing a great job at holding it all together during this time of unprecedented confusion.

But he gives more grace.  Therefore it says, “God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble.” James 4:6 (ESV)

Perhaps, in part, this is happening (in my life) so that I can learn humility.  Shocking as it might sound, I am not great at everything.  I am learning through this pandemic that ‘okay’ is okay.  I am reminding myself the same thing I wrote about in August 2017, “If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly (G.K. Chesterton).”  If there is one thing I have learned from the last month, it is that good news can be captured and shared via video clips of subpar quality.  Those who are recording recovering patients leaving hospitals or grateful citizens banging pots out their windows to appreciate healthcare heroes could not care less about the pixelization or poor sound quality of their contribution toward our collective goodwill.

Give yourself a break.  Give those around you a break.  Practice humility.  Accept limitations.  Delight in sufficiency.  Celebrate little victories.  Immerse yourself in good news.  Release the frustrations associated with perfection and embrace the joy attributable to the ordinary.  Do your best and attempt the rest.  Enjoy the grace of God that He gives to the humble.  Keep on doing what you are able to do until we can do it altogether all together.

Defining Love

Like an estimated 102 million other people, I watched the Super Bowl a few week ago.  It was a great end to the NFL season.  However, what will remain with me for much longer than the play on the field was a particularly moving commercial that ran relatively early in the broadcast.  Paid for by New York Life, it began by stating that the ancient Greeks had four words for love.  According to the advertisement:

  • “Philia is affection that grows from friendship”;
  • “Storgé – the kind [of love] you have for a grandparent or a brother”;
  • “Eros – the uncontrollable urge to say ‘I love you’”; and
  • “Agapé, the most admirable – love as an action; it takes courage, sacrifice, and strength.”

Maybe it was the mention of ancient Greek, a language with which I wrestle for comprehension every week.  Maybe it was the powerful visuals of the varied aspects of love.  Whatever the reason, I was captivated by the commercial and its message: that love takes action.

Fast-forward twelve days to today, Valentine’s Day, the (inter)national holiday celebrating love.  I wonder, in light of this commercial, which love we are celebrating as we exchange cards?  Are we appreciating the love of our friends, or our family, or our ‘significant other’, or those who sacrifice to provide all that we require?  It is likely that today will be, to some degree, a recognition of the first three loves, but especially focused on our romantic loves.  Restaurants will be patronized, florists will be utilized and confectioners will be supported.

Love is patient, love is kind.  It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud.  It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs.  Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth.  It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.  1 Corinthians 13:4-7

At the same time, there will be many celebrating Valentine’s Day in other ways and in other places.  They will visit the nursing home and spoon-feed their mom supper.  They will drop by a cemetery and pull the weeds around their husband’s marker.  They will assist their daughter into a transport van and accompany her to physical therapy.  They will sit in the hospital with their 8-year old son as he undergoes treatment for leukemia.  These are the ones who will be demonstrating agapé love today, and tomorrow, not because it is Valentine’s Day, but because that is what ‘love as an action’ looks like.

I hope that everyone who is reading this has a Valentine, someone who will say to you today (with accoutrements or not), “I love you”.  I hope you will enjoy a Whitman Sampler or a Reese’s heart, a nice candle-lit prix-fixe dinner, or a bouquet of lilies.  I pray even more that everyone who is reading this today has someone who has shown them agapé – that sacrificial, surrendering, willful emptying of themselves for the sake of another.  I am blessed to know that kind of love.  I pray you are as well.

Happy St. Valentine’s Day (or in Greek, ευτυχισμένη ημέρα του Αγίου Βαλεντίνου)!

Plans for the Summer

Last Monday, Memorial Day, was the cultural beginning of summer and tomorrow, June 1st, is its start, meteorologically.  While I do not consider it summer until the air conditioners are placed in the windows (alas, no central air for us), I realize that it is that time again when we ask one another if we have made our vacation plans yet.  For those of us in New England, it is the time we take the ice scrapers out of the car and replace them with beach chairs; it is the time when we begin to enjoy ice cream in cones while on a walk rather than in bowls while watching TV.  It is a time for cookouts and campouts.

I hope you have plans for the summer – going to the lake or the mountains, spending time in the nation’s capital or at the in-laws, visiting a newest theme park or watching the latest blockbuster.  I hope that these plans for the summer, whether at home or away, includes the worship of the Lord.  I hope that your summer plans at your home church and the places you visit while on vacation allow you to offer our whole selves to God in grateful praise.

Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God – this is your true and proper worship.  Romans 12:1

As Paul says to the church in Rome, this offering of ourselves is primarily a sacrificial act intended to glorify God.  The imagery he uses is one of an altar, the sacred place of righteous giving.  As a way of responding to God’s mercy, we give ourselves – our time, talent and treasure – with gifts that are of varied amounts (some can give an hour or a dollar, while others have more to give) in completely voluntary ways.  In light of all the blessings you enjoy because of God’s kindness, could you spend a bit of your summertime resources appreciating Him?

This offering, however, will have consequences.  When we agree to offer our bodies, we offer all its parts.  This act of generosity effects our talking, for our tongues have been offered.  This act of generosity effects our toiling, for our hands have been offered.  This act of generosity effects our traveling, for our legs have been offered.  There may be plans, on vacation or at home, that will need to be curtailed or delayed because we are offering our resources to Him.  The beach and the barbeque will have to wait.  It is always better to exercise your faith in flip flops than to forgo the blessing of gathering altogether.

Our rightful response to the blessings God gives us – our vacations and vocations, our purses and our purposes – is to be living sacrifices.  We are living sacrifices: continually, in every season and on every day, offering what He has given us to share.  We are holy sacrifices: set apart for His purposes.  We are pleasing sacrifices: demonstrating what is appropriate for Him.  I hope that this attitude is the highlight of your next season.

Thank You for Your Service

According to the Pew Research Center, there are more than 20.4 million veterans alive today in the United States, slightly more than one in sixteen Americans.  This weekend, we commemorate their sacrifice, and the sacrifices of their loved ones, as we observe Veteran’s Day.  We take time as a country to recognize the efforts of the members of our armed forces – Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Marines and Navy – as they defended our freedom in World War II, the Korean Conflict, the Viet Nam War, the Gulf War and in peace-time service.  We recognize those who are presently serving on ships and at bases across the globe, and we recognize those who remain at home awaiting their return.

When I turned eighteen (in the winter of ’84), there were no on-going war zones and so I was not compelled to enlist or serve.  In a way, I feel that I missed out on something special.  I was not willing to endure the hardships of basic training or the rigors of living in barracks.  I also missed out on the camaraderie and support of one soldier supporting another, of one pilot protecting the back of another, of one sailor confiding in another or one marine securing the success of another.  We must respect these servicewomen and men who see the cause ahead of them as greater than all they have left behind and are willing to bear the cost that cause demands.

Join with me in suffering, like a good soldier of Christ Jesus.  2 Timothy 2:3

How does that old camp song go?  “I may never march in the infantry, ride in the cavalry, shoot the artillery.  I may never fly o’er the enemy, but I’m in the Lord’s army!”  Now, I am in no way equating the life-threatening peril faced by a veteran and the daily drudgery of a follower of Christ.  What I am thinking about is what might happen if the kingdom of God had citizens who were willing to suffer as a good soldier.  What ground could be claimed, what captives could be set free, if we, as followers of Christ, see the cause ahead of us – the redemption of souls through the furthering of the gospel – as greater than all we want to keep for ourselves.  What if we, too, were willing to bear the cost that cause demands.

There is a great debt that we all owe to all those who are willing to sacrifice everything for our freedom.  This debt extends from Jesus, who entered enemy territory to set us free from the bondage of death and sin, to every member of the military, who entered enemy territory to secure life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness.  We ought to be grateful for the sacrifices that secure our freedoms and recognize the costs that others have made.  May the followers of Christ have the same commitment to those around them that the veterans we celebrate on November 11th have.

For those who wore, or are wearing, the flag on their shoulder, we thank you.

Taking One for the Team

On Sunday night, the Boston Red Sox won their fourth World Series in the last fifteen years.  As I was preparing my thoughts for this post, I read my post from November 1, 2013, the last time the Red Sox won it all.  At that time, I was particularly impressed with John Lackey, who had a checkered past as a Red Sox pitcher but came up big in the playoffs, even getting the win in the Series clinching game.  He was a living example of the biblical practice of “forgetting what is behind and straining toward what is ahead (Philippians 3:13).”

This time around it was another pitcher, in fact the pitcher who got the win in this year’s Series clinching game, with whom I was particularly enamored.  David Price, the highest paid player on the Red Sox, has always been an ace (an exceptional starting pitcher) in the regular season, but, entering the 2018 post-season, had amassed an 0-9 record in games he started in the playoffs.  It looked like it would be more of the same this year when Price lost to the Yankees in game 2 of the A.L. Divisional Series and received a no-decision in game 2 of the A.L. Championship Series.

Hope for the hometown team was flagging when Price was named the starter for game 5 of the ALCS.  However, as Price put it, he “figured something out while [warming up in the bullpen for a possible relief appearance in game 4], and it kind of just carried over” into his start the following day.  He was spectacular, earning his first win in the playoffs as a starter (and clinching the American League pennant).  He was then spectacular a few days later, in game 2 of the World Series, earning his second win, and then, a few days after that, winning his third consecutive start and securing the World Series for the Red Sox.

The amazing truth in all this is that David Price is in the middle of his contract (which, I remind you, is the highest in Red Sox history) and – win, lose or no-decision – would have been paid the same amount for the next 4 years.  Yet, Price pitched three times in the World Series (once as a reliever) and willingly sacrificed himself for he team.  Price literally did everything he could do to win, leaving everything he had on the field of play.  By doing this, he went from scapegoat to hero in the span of ten days.

And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.  Colossians 3:17

Because of David Price, I am reminded that all that I do can and should glorify God.  It is only reasonable for me to do all that I am capable of doing in building for His kingdom, expanding His gospel and expressing His love to those around me.  I am able to sacrifice more than I think so that I can accomplish more than I expect.  I thank God that our record from the past does not dictate our productivity in the future.  When we are willing to do whatever it takes, sometimes God will use that to enable us to take it all.

Greatest Love

This past week the city of Boston mourned the loss of two of its heroes:  Boston Fire Department’s Lieutenant Ed Walsh and Firefighter Michael Kennedy.  I cannot say that I knew these brave men who perished battling an inferno on Beacon Street last Wednesday, only that I wish I had.   From the glimpses of their personal and professional lives I’ve gotten from the news coverage, these were compassionate and strong men cut down in the prime of life.  My thoughts and prayers go out to all those who knew and loved them.   BFD

“Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.”  John 15:13 (NIV)

Lt. Walsh and FF Kennedy are just two of the hundreds of heroes that we in the city of Boston are blessed to have.  The tragedy of March 26th should remind us all of the risks and sacrifices that our city’s finest – our police, fire and emergency officers – make for us every day.  We ought to be grateful that there are those among us willing to enter burning buildings, active crime scenes and smashed vehicles to ensure our safety and security.  We are blessed that there are those who are willing to lay down their lives for us.

If you were like me, it was emotionally overwhelming to see the thousands of officers in uniform from all across the globe in Watertown and West Roxbury paying tribute to their fallen brothers.  As I watched portions of the funerals, I thought of the other officers at their posts, at their fire stations waiting for a call, waiting to risk their lives for the sake of their community.  It was in that moment that the words of Jesus reached their greatest clarity in my mind:  there is no greater love than this.

Later this month, we will observe Easter and celebrate the Lord’s victory over death.  But before we can celebrate by singing “He Lives” and “Christ the Lord is Risen Today” we will need to endure Good Friday, the day we watch the Savior die.  Jesus knew that his disciples were not fully prepared for this and so he shares his heart with them on the eve of his death.  Among a great many other things, he shares the words quoted above.   His words are comforting to those whom life has dealt a bitter blow.  His words remind us of the great love those who sacrifice all have for others and the great love God has for us.

“But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.”   Romans 5:8 (NIV)

Our hope and comfort begins with the fact that Christ died for us; that he laid down his life for us, his friends.   Our hope and comfort remains due to the fact that death could not hold him and that he rose victorious, and he promises to take all who believe in him to be with him forever.   This is the hope and comfort I pray for the Walsh and Kennedy family and for all those who sacrifice – on home soil or foreign – for our collective safety and security.