Tag Archives: reconciliation

Needed Change

Allow me to state, up front, that I cannot understand, as a middle-aged white man, the frustrations and fears which are associated with being a person of color in America.  I cannot honestly declare that I know what it feels like to be stopped by the police based primarily, if not solely, upon the color of my skin.  I have no frame of reference where I am able to equate walking in my community with the possibility of being attacked.  While I cannot express empathy (where we would share in a mutual emotion) with those mourning and protesting across the country, I can and do express sympathy (where we come alongside one another as we share our unique experiences).

What I can do, as a minister of the gospel and pastor of a city-cited church, is listen to the voices of the oppressed and marginalized.  I can also share relevant and revelatory biblical truth.   To do that, I would like to share something that someone smarter than me has said:

The Scripture is what tells us that the idolization of the flesh is sin (Gal. 5:16-24), that hatred of those made in the image of God is sin (1 Jn. 3:11-15), that mistreating people with the justice system is sin (Prov. 17:15; 23:10), that ignoring the cries of those being mistreated is sin (Deut. 23:14-15; Jas. 5:4).  And the Scripture tells us that that sin, without repentance, brings the judgment of God (Rom. 6:23).  That is true not only for those who personally rebel against God’s holiness and justice but also those who “give approval to those who practice them” (Rom. 1:32).  That is a dreadful reality, to which those of us in Christ are called to serve as ambassadors pleading, as though Christ were pleading through us, “be reconciled to God” (2 Cor. 5:20).  – Russell Moore

Each and every human being is made in the image of God.  Each and every human being is fearfully and wonderfully made by the Almighty.  Each and every human being is God’s handiwork and created in Christ Jesus to do good work.   While holding tight to these truths, we also hold onto the biblical mandate to care for and champion the cause of those whose voices have been silenced: in the time of Christ and the apostles, the voiceless were the widows and orphans, the sick and unclean, the Samaritans and the Gentiles; in our day, they are people of color, as well as the homeless, the hungry and the trafficked.

To follow Christ means to follow Christ.  Jesus was a member of the favored demographic, albeit from a back-water region of the nation, who confronted injustice and spoke for the down-trodden.  He had his own challenges (he had no place to lay his head and was harassed by the authorities) but remained diligent in making sure that the issues and concerns of the dismissed were addressed.  We are to follow Him along that same path.  We must stand in opposition to injustice, hear the cries of those who have been silenced and labor to ensure that the dividing wall of hostility, which Christ destroyed, remains dismantled.

May the needed changes come through the people of God.

Meeting at the Cross

Today is Good Friday, the day on the Christian calendar when we remember and reflect upon the crucifixion of the Lord.  Some of us will get together at a local church and hear the Gospel account of the cross.  Others of us will spend some time alone reflecting on the death of Jesus.  In whatever way you choose to recognize this pivotal moment in human history, I pray that you will appreciate the awesome transaction that took place on the Palestinian hillside nearly two millennia ago.  I hope you will rejoice over that moment when Jesus cried out, “It is finished”, and gave up His spirit (as John 19:30 tells us), that moment when every member of the human race was offered reconciliation.

We are offered reconciliation with God, since we know that the cross resulted in the full forgiveness of sin, pardon from our willfully disobedient nature that separates us from our creator.  Jesus (who committed no sin) gave His life for us (who are sinful) to completely satisfy the wrath of God.  Instead of suffering the appropriate consequences for our actions, Jesus paid the price with His life and enabled us to reunite with God.  Through the death of Jesus – the public, ghastly and humiliating death of Jesus – we are declared forgiven and allowed entrance into the heavenly realms.

This is wonderfully good news, but there’s more.  We are also offered reconciliation with one another.  As Paul wrote:

For he himself is our peace, who has made the two groups one and has destroyed the barrier, the dividing wall of hostility, by setting aside in his flesh the law with its commands and regulations.  His purpose was to create in himself one new humanity out of the two, thus making peace, and in one body to reconcile both of them to God through the cross, by which he put to death their hostility.   Ephesians 2:14-16 (NIV)

Before Good Friday, all people were separated by a wall of hostility into two camps – those who were under God’s covenant and those who were not.  This separation is a symptom of our sin and caused people then, as it causes people now, to divide one another into two distinct groups: us and them.  We like us and we hate them.  Today’s divisions are no longer about rabbinical interpretations of Old Testament law, but of gender and politics and class and ethnicity.  The cross has destroyed the dividing wall of hostility.

Rejoice today that we are reconciled with our Creator and with our fellow-created through the cross of Jesus Christ.  We need never be alienated from God or from our neighbor because of Christ’s sacrifice on Good Friday.  When we stand before the cross today, literally or figuratively, let us all remember that through His death we gain peace with God and unity with all those who stand beside us.   I pray you will accept His offer of reconciliation and receive the peace that passes all understanding.

I wish you all a happy and healthy Easter.

A Peace of My Mind

The events of last Tuesday night greatly disturbed my household.  We were all gathered around the television watching the election results when suddenly we were surprised by some jarring noises – a work crew from the gas company was setting up shop in the middle of our ‘cul-de-sac’.  Before we knew it, a truck, a backhoe and a team of experts were opening a hole in the asphalt, blocking us from driving out of our driveway.  Eventually we were told that the gas main (installed in 1928) had ruptured and needed to be replaced; the gas company was cutting a trench down our street when I left for work on Wednesday.  Thankfully, the workers could move their equipment and we could move our vehicles with little inconvenience. flag

As we watched these developments on Tuesday night and the aftermath on Wednesday, our displeasure with the situation increased.  We were angry that we were not consulted and our needs were not considered.  We were bothered that our freedom was hindered and we had no one to blame.  While we wanted to go outside and loudly complain to whoever would listen, we remained silent – we knew our angry outbursts would not accomplish anything good and possibly produce something bad.  We were faced with the ubiquitous station in life where we had reason to be angry.   But should that reason result in our making it a right?

If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone.   Romans 12:18 (NIV)

We live in a strongly individualized society.  We are continually offended, insulted and aggrieved by those around us exercising their freedoms.  We hear things that disturb our sensibilities and see things raise our rancor, causing us to consider seeking retaliation.  But if we know Jesus as Lord and Savior, we must reconsider our desires to indulge these inner voices. We, as Christians, are called to live at peace.  And the best way to live at peace is through practicing three peace-making disciplines.

Hostility is not the answer and “fighting fire with fire” only increases the flames.  When we want retribution, we would be wise to pray, to have patience and to show compassion.  Whether it is for authorities (like presidents or police) or aggravators (like gas company employees), we can lift them up in prayer and seek for them God’s wisdom to make the best decisions.  Whether it is for commuters (noisy riders on the train or aggressive drivers on the roads) or critics (with ‘helpful advice’ or hateful rhetoric), we can exhibit patience and endure discomfort.  Whatever separates or divides us (economics, experiences or ethnicities), we can show compassion by choosing to consider their side and contemplate our shared struggles.

The world needs peacemakers, people who are actively seeking reconciliation and common ground.  If the national events of Tuesday night are any indication, half of us are dealing with disappointment and the rest are (very) cautiously optimistic about our country’s direction.  We are a divided nation needing people who seek unity.  We need people who will pray, be patient and bring compassion to our neighbors and our neighborhoods.  Will you accept the Bible’s challenge and live at peace with everyone, as much as it depends upon you?