Tag Archives: Palm Sunday

There’s No Need to Fear! Underdog Is Here!

I am sure that some of you are not basketball fans, let alone college basketball fans.  To be honest, I am, at best, a casual observer of the college game.  However, every once in a while something happens on the court that makes it beyond the sports update and into the ‘regular’ news.  Such an occurrence happened last Thursday when the University of Maryland – Baltimore County Retrievers defeated the University of Virginia Cavaliers in the NCAA men’s basketball tournament.  The win marked the first time a 16-seed (the lowest seeding that the tournament gives) had ever defeated a 1-seed in the tournament (there had been 135 previous match-ups over the past 34 years).  Ultimately, that is where the good news ends, as two days later the Retrievers exited the tournament with a loss to Kansas State.

There is just something about the underdog, the long shot and the dark horse: that competitor thought to have little chance of winning a fight or contest.  Our human nature roots for David as he battles Goliath and cheers for Buster Douglas as he contends against Mike Tyson.  We want to believe that in any fight anyone could win.  We want to live in a world where the little guy could catch a break and beat the big guy at his own game.   Even if it has never happened before, a major league baseball team could win a playoff series even when it is down three games to none and a nation football league team could win the championship even when it is down by 25 points with little more than 17 minutes left in the game.  We all want to live in a world where anything is possible.

In so many areas of life, you and I are the underdog.  Cancer is the 1-seed and we are the 16-seed with little chance for victory.  Poverty has a three-game lead over us and we remain winless.  Sin is ahead by 25 points and time is running out.   All is not lost, however, as we can rest in the promise of our Lord in scripture:

Jesus looked at them and said, “With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.”  Matthew 19:26

“…With God all things are possible.”  Not inevitable, but possible.  Not probable, but possible.  With God, anyone can enjoy victory over any seemingly undefeatable thing.

This weekend we enter Passion Week as the church, the eight days leading up to the world-changing victory of Easter over a previously unbeatable foe.   I hope that you will engage with the body of Christ as Christians of every tradition observe the misunderstood and vastly underestimated challenger enters the court in Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, share in the pre-contest meal with his teammates on Maundy Thursday and participate in the main event on Good Friday.  I hope that you will rejoice with others as we celebrate the devastating defeat of the previously undefeated sin and the once all-conquering death.   Join us, as a local church or as the universal representation of God’s kingdom, as we declare that ‘with God all things are possible’, that the tomb is empty and the slate is wiped clean.  The underdog, the least and the lowest, will one day be victorious.

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Driving the Parade Float

In our church’s most recent newsletter (found at http://calvary-boston.org/newletter.pdf), I wrote about my reservations about public praise and my resolve to increase that praise in light of Jesus’s admonition on Palm Sunday.   “If the people won’t cry out, the rocks will,” Jesus told the Pharisees.  This rebuke of the religious elite has challenged me to praise God so that the Lord need not replace the praise that I ought to be offering with that of a stone.  Part of Palm Sunday is celebrating the triumphal entry of the conquering king, knowing that He has conquered sin, death and the Devil. 

But this is only part of the Palm Sunday narrative.  The Gospel of Luke begins the day we know as Palm Sunday with a conversation between two unnamed disciples and Jesus.  Jesus commands these two to enter into town and secure the services of a donkey.  It was an important task, as it would fulfill a Scriptural prophecy about the Messiah.  But it is just “transportation” ministry – two of the divine dozen, the chosen students of the Lord, being asked to call for an Uber® instead of doing something more important.  Maybe they struggled with a temptation I occasionally face: thinking that they had been called to greater things than this.

“Go to the village ahead of you, and as you enter it, you will find a colt tied there, which no one has ever ridden.  Untie it and bring it here.  If anyone asks you, ‘Why are you untying it?’ say, ‘The Lord needs it.’”    Luke 19:30-31 (NIV)

Imagine you were walking in the sandals of those two unnamed disciples as they witnessed the triumphal entry.  Would you be tempted to say, “Hey, none of this would have been possible without me”?  Would you want Jesus to acknowledge your contribution to the parade?  Would you, at some later date, tell Matthew (your fellow disciple) to make sure he mentions your name when inspired to write about Jesus’ ride into Jerusalem?   We can wonder how we might react to such a request from Jesus, but there is no question how these two unnamed disciples reacted – with humble obedience.  They did what they were told without question or credit, pure and simple.

Knowing what transpired once Jesus mounted the donkey (the praise and adoration of the crowd), it makes me think that there is a link between obedience and worship.  There must be something that connects our sacrifice and our singing.  It seems that we cannot fully rejoice in the Lord until we have first committed our lives to the Lord.  We praise Jesus – His power, His protection, His provision and His prodding – because we have seen Jesus.   We have seen the evidences of His mighty acts and heard the expressions of His salvation.  And having seen and heard what the Lord can do, we are willing to follow Him wherever He leads.  Then, as we follow Him wherever He leads, we witness the praise and rejoicing He alone deserves.

It is good to know that all our efforts – our deeds and sacrifices – will produce, on earth and in heaven, glorious praise to our King.  That is ultimately our greatest reward.