Tag Archives: Luke 2:20

Raising an Ebenezer

Part of my preparations for celebrating Christmas this year is that I have been reading the novella A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens.  While I have seen the films and adaptations on television (my personal favorites are Mr.Magoo’s Christmas Carol and Scrooged), I had never read the relatively short story of Ebenezer Scrooge and the three visiting Spirits.  On the page or on the screen, the plot is well-known:  Scrooge is a successful business owner with great accumulated wealth who is inundated with charitable requests as Christmas approaches; as returns home on Christmas Eve, he is visited by the ghost of his business partner and then three Christmas Spirits; these Spirits show Scrooge his Christmases  past, present and yet to come; these visions have a profound effect on his miserly and calloused heart.

We are all tempted to be a bit like Ebenezer Scrooge at Christmas.  We also receive a barrage of demands for our time and our finances and our kindnesses to care for those with pressing needs.  We might be inclined to think only of ourselves and not about our fellow man and woman.  We might need to be reminded of what is more important than earthly gain.  But where can we find three Spirits on such short notice?

There is another character in Dickens’ novella that serves as a contrast to Ebenezer Scrooge: Bob Cratchit.  Cratchit is Scrooge’s clerk and he is all that Scrooge is not; despite his lack of material resources, he is generous and kind.  Cratchit has his reasons for cynicism – a terrible boss, an insufficient income and a sick child – but he is continually focused on others.  Cratchit is the one who goes to church and he is the one who prays for his heartless boss.  He is the one who carries within himself the joy of Christmas despite having several reasons for the contrary.  While Scrooge was the one who was converted to compassion, Cratchit was continually kind.

This being said, A Christmas Carol is more of a moral fable than a spiritual allegory.  In Dickens’ tale, Christmas is the setting, not the story.  None of us are as hardened as Scrooge and none of us are as virtuous as Cratchit.  All of us can be more compassionate and all of us can share more joy.  Instead of comparing ourselves to a archetypal fictional miser or milquetoast, we are better suited to reflect the character of real individuals.

The shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all the things they had heard and seen, which were just as they had been told.  Luke 2:20 (NIV)

These shepherds were, in many ways, like Scrooge – driven by their vocation to sacrifice most relationships, they accumulated wealth and were ostracized by society.  But one day they received a message from God and that transformed their hearts and lives.  They were changed by the good news of great joy that a savior had been born, and after seeing the Christ child, returned to their workplace with gladness in their hearts.   When they saw (when we see) the great gift we have been given, we shout, “Glorious” – how glorious is our God, His creation and His plan for each one of us to care for each one of us.

A Daily Advent-ure

I have a simple question for all those reading this: when do we stop celebrating our “Season’s Greetings”?  When the radio and television stations return to their regular programming?  When the last Christmas cookies have been eaten?  When the tree and decorations are taken down?  When the final greeting card, initially misdirected by the Post Office, arrives?  Until the next holiday is celebrated? Until the children return to school after their Winter Break?  Once all the exterior lights have been boxed and stored away?  I suppose we all must move on from all of those special gatherings with family and friends filled with all sorts of special traditions and resume the mundane schedule of everyday life, but when?

But what if I do not want to move on from Christmas?  What if I still want to reflect on the gifts of advent – the hope, peace, joy and love that comes through the appearing of Christ?  What if the remembrance of the 1st advent at Bethlehem, has whet my appetite for the 2nd advent when Christ shall descend from the clouds?  While I can dispense with the carols and the cookies, I would like to retain the warmth of the manger, the worship of the shepherds, the hospitality of the city of David and the generosity of God, the Father.

When [the shepherds] had seen him, they spread the word concerning what had been told them about this child….  The shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all the things they had heard and seen, which were just as they had been told.  Luke 2:17-20

I want to be like those shepherds, so impacted by the facts and sensations of Christmas that they were undeniably transformed.  Because of the advent, these blue-collar laborers went from sheep herders shaking in fear to pastors leading lost sheep to verdant fields.  They went back to their ordinary schedules with an understanding of the extraordinary sights and sounds of the Savior born in a Bethlehem manger.  They were changed by Christmas, as is evidenced by their propensity for giving glory and praise to God.  They had no special carols or cards or casseroles – they had the Christ and He was sufficient to sustain them.

I will, in the days ahead, put everything that symbolizes Christmas into boxes or, in the case of our tree, onto the curb – all the external stimuli that reminds me of that blessed event two thousand years ago.  But, like the shepherds, I will continue to carry inside me all the sounds, scents and sights that make Christmas special.  My hope is that the inward prompts of these sensational sensations will stimulate my soul to maintain a spirit of glory and praise every day in every place as I interact with everyone.  Instead of celebrating Christmas throughout the year, perhaps I can communicate the hope, peace, joy and love of Immanuel – God with us – for a while longer.

Lord, help me to remember that on every day that ends with ‘y’ that Christ came to inaugurate “Glory to God in the highest heaven, and on earth peace to those on whom his favor rests.”