Tag Archives: light

You Will Be Mist, Part 2

As I am sure you are aware, Rev. William (Billy) Franklin Graham reunited with His Savior on February 21st.  Although I never met him, nor heard him speak in person, he was a co-founder and trustee emeritus of my alma mater, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary (and I have his signature on my degree).  Billy Graham was instrumental in shaping evangelicalism in the 20th century: thousands heard and accepted the Gospel through the crusades he conducted across the globe, thousands more have been encouraged through his writings (including the co-founding of Christianity Today Magazine), and untold numbers of national and world leaders had sought his advice and counsel.  He was a giant not only in the church, but in our culture.  That being said, when I mentioned his passing at our dinner table, my 10-year old son, Joshua, had no idea who Billy Graham was.

Jump ahead a week.  It is the night before the Oscars® and our family is watching what would ultimately be given the award for Best Animated Feature, Coco.   The film’s storyline is simple (albeit contradictory to biblical truth): a boy, Miguel, raids a mausoleum to steal a guitar from his hero on Día de Muertos (The Day of the Dead) and is brought to the land of the dead, where he meets his ancestors and discovers a secret.  One interesting aspect of the ‘other side’ that Miguel finds out as he is interacting with those who have passed is that you disappear when there is no one left who remembers your stories.  According to the movie, when no one remains to remember your name, you cease to exist.

As great as Billy Graham (the man, the preacher, the writer or the friend) was, within a generation or two, he will be largely forgotten.  And as harsh as that seems, the Bible concurs:

Why, you do not even know what will happen tomorrow.  What is your life?  You are a mist that appears for a little while and then vanishes.  James 4:14 (NIV)

So, what does this say for me or for you?  Maybe we are like lightbulbs – we shine for a while, but eventually we will cease to give light and we will be discarded.  Maybe some of you are like lamps – useful for many cycles of lightbulbs, but still subject to the ravages of time and eventually replaced by a cheaper lamp from Ikea©.  Whether a lightbulb or a lamp, we are merely a conduit for the electricity.  Lightbulbs and lamps (like us) come and go, but the electricity (in this metaphor, the Lord God Almighty) remains.

Billy Graham was somewhat like a lighthouse lamp: strong, powerful, and steady in its purpose; but that light has gone.  I pray another light will rise to take his place.  While I, in comparison, may be a night light, I still can be strong, powerful, and steady in my purpose until I have been fully spent.  Within a generation or two, I will likely be forgotten – a name on a list or a letter, an unfamiliar face in a yellowed photograph – but for now, let me make some impact and shed some light.  Perhaps I could guide the next world-changer to avoid stumbling in the dark long enough to see the true Light of the world.

photo found on billygraham.org


Christmas Break

“And there were shepherds living out in the fields nearby, keeping watch over their flocks at night.”  Luke 2:8 (NIV)

Of all the people involved in the Christmas narrative, I find myself identifying most with the shepherds.  While I am not a rugged outdoorsman with an extensive knowledge of ovine behavior, there are a few touchpoints with their lives that intrigue me.  These men, and perhaps women, were hard working – braving the weather of ancient Palestine, warding off the dangers that surrounded them, satisfying the needs of those placed in their care – and strong willed.  They were likely underappreciated by those around them (performing a necessary task but smelling like the livestock) and underestimated in their hometowns (battling the assumptions that they were simple-minded and poorly groomed).  They were the “little people” that most of us pass by unnoticed.   xmas

But that all changed when God interrupted their lives.  According to Luke, these shepherds were living out in the fields with their sheep, taking care of business, when suddenly a messenger of God appeared in the nighttime sky.   Many others, before and since, have a similar experience; they were living their lives, doing their best, when suddenly, God breaks through the “business as usual” with His spectacular presence.  Praise God that the shepherds realized what was happening and responded with reverence.  They listened and believed.  Interestingly, at least on this occasion, God didn’t interrupt the prayers of the temple or the plans of the king; He announced the miraculous to the common man.

What happened to that common man, what happened to those shepherds, is equally astounding.  Those who lived out in the fields and smelled like the sheep they tended became the spokespeople for God.  After seeing the child, just the way he was promised, they began telling those around them the good news – that the Savior has been born and the promised one has arrived.  The Bible says that the people who heard the shepherds’ story were amazed, perhaps by the message and perhaps by the messengers.  God broke through into the lives of ordinary people and allowed them to do something extraordinary.

The wonderful truth connected with the shepherds at Christmas is that God is the same yesterday, today and forever.  The one who shattered the darkness near Bethlehem with His brilliant glory is still doing the same thing today.  He is still sending messengers to ordinary people, announcing the arrival of Christ the Lord.  I know this because He broke into my life with His glorious light, albeit not with literal brilliance.  I was happily seeking out an ordinary life after being raised in an ordinary household.  In one moment, I changed from an unremarkable banker to a reflection of Him.  It wasn’t when I first trusted Him or when I was baptized, but rather when I saw and heard the truth and know I couldn’t keep it to myself.

My story led me to become a youth leader and a pastor, but I could have, like those shepherds of long ago, returned to my field with praise and glory to God.  No matter where life finds us, we are all surrounded by God’s glory; we simply need to recognize it.  Especially at Christmas, embrace the enchantment of the Nativity.  Let those songs in the background become a beacon for Him.  Allow those lights on the tree serve as a taste of the light of the Lord.  And when God breaks through, listen.

Merry Christmas!

A Light Break

The people walking in darkness have seen a great light; on those living in the land of deep darkness a light has dawned.    Isaiah 9:2

One of the blessings of our new neighborhood is that the house three doors away covers his front yard with a Christmas light display.  We had seen the lights in prior years as we drove by, but now we can stand on the sidewalk while enjoying the details: a reindeer that moves its head, “Merry Christmas” written on the fence, a flying angel and more.  It is quite a spectacle to behold.  There must be a thousand lights on their yard, smack dab in the middle of the urban landscape.  It shines bright through the community.img_1281

Christmas lights like these remind me of the prophet Isaiah’s words, that one day in the future a great light will dawn in the land of deep darkness.  One day, God inspired Isaiah to record, the darkness — the muck of gloom and distress that we all are mired within – will be overwhelmed and overcome.  Just as it was when Isaiah wrote to the people of his day, we, too, witness the same distress and gloom today in the faces of those seeking refuge on foreign soil, those oppressed by human systems, those who are poor and those who have lost hope.  There is a great darkness that requires a great light.  Christmas lights remind me that Jesus is that great light.

When Jesus spoke again to the people, he said, “I am the light of the world.  Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.”     John 8:12

Jesus told the people of His day – and beyond, through the testimony of the Scriptures – that He was the one who would conquer the distress and gloom of creation.  In time, His followers would realize that He is the one who reigns victorious over sin, Satan and death; the things that caused hopelessness in the human heart have been vanquished by the appearing of Jesus, the promised light.  Just as flipping a light switch in a darkened room immediately dispels the darkness, Jesus, at the moment of His arrival, dispelled all the darkness we were dealing with.  Then, Jesus gave us that light to share with others.

[Jesus said,] “You are the light of the world. A town built on a hill cannot be hidden.”  Matthew 5:14

He called us, His followers, the light of the world.  He commissioned us, His brothers and sisters in faith, to continue to shine in the darkness.  He equipped us, His body, to bear witness to those who are without hope in the world that the darkness has been defeated.  We are the ones who are now visiting prisons, hospitals, shelters and halfway houses with the expressed intent of eliminating the gloom and distress that many in our society are saddled with.  We are the ones who, like my neighbor, bear the expense for the blessing of those around us.  You are the light of the world.

So, this Christmas season, find those dark corners of your community and shine for them.  Seek those who are in distress or gloom and share the light of hope around them.  Be a blessing to those without one.  And be blessed in the warmth of His great light.