Tag Archives: Legos

Building Blocks

The other day I picked up our youngest son, Joshua, from a library program where he had been building robots with Legos®.  It was amazing to see what could be built with things my son had at his disposal.  From those four basic components (the EV3 computer, sensors, motors and Lego® pieces), he was able to build useful and powerful machines.  Legos® have come a long way from when I was a kid: then, we could build a “blocky” plane or a car (which we could imagine to be the real things), but now you can design and control an actual moving vehicle.

Watching Joshua ‘play’ with these toys made me think about the church, the local representation of the kingdom of God.  I always pictured, as all my kids and I played with the little plastic bricks, that this is what the Bible must have been referring to when Peter wrote that we, the saints, were being built into a temple.  We may not all look the same (we come in different colors, lengths, widths and thicknesses), but we all can be useful in the construction plan of God.  To steal a sentiment from The Lego Movie: in the hands of the Master Builder, we all can be special.

As you come to him, the living Stone – rejected by humans but chosen by God and precious to him – you also, like living stones, are being built into a spiritual house to be a holy priesthood, offering spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ.      1 Peter 2:4-5

Then, as Joshua was explaining these new components, I thought deeper about the matter.  The computer unit provides the direction to the structure, much like the Word of God provides direction for the church.  The sensors and motors translate that information from the computer into kinetic energy, just as the Holy Spirit translates the written Word into the Living Word as we gather as the church.  And then, as one diverse but cohesive whole, the unit moves and accomplishes the purpose of the designer, whether we are talking of a Lego® robot or a local congregation.   This is all in accordance with the designer’s plan.

Regarding this metaphor of the church being like a structure built with an interlocking brick system, it also reflects the truth that function is not defined by form.  Anyone who has ever ventured into the Lego® Store knows that there are boxes of these bricks that that can make a “Super Soarer” for $9.99 and the US Capitol Building for $99.99.  Does brick count make the project better?  Not necessarily.  Whether it is Legos® or churches, the size of the building is not as important as the enjoyment of the ‘build’.  If you need a pencil holder, having a replica of the Millennium Falcon will not satisfy your need.  And if your family’s experience with Legos® is anything like mine, all the set pieces get mixed together pretty quickly, and that is really when the fun and creativity starts.

I’m so glad I’m a part of the multi-colored structure that God is designing with our church.  We may not be very big, but we are beautiful.  We may not have a large brick count, but we are being used to bring our creator glory.  And like Legos®, we (as a church) began as an idea in Scandinavia.

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