Tag Archives: Good Friday

Meeting at the Cross

Today is Good Friday, the day on the Christian calendar when we remember and reflect upon the crucifixion of the Lord.  Some of us will get together at a local church and hear the Gospel account of the cross.  Others of us will spend some time alone reflecting on the death of Jesus.  In whatever way you choose to recognize this pivotal moment in human history, I pray that you will appreciate the awesome transaction that took place on the Palestinian hillside nearly two millennia ago.  I hope you will rejoice over that moment when Jesus cried out, “It is finished”, and gave up His spirit (as John 19:30 tells us), that moment when every member of the human race was offered reconciliation.

We are offered reconciliation with God, since we know that the cross resulted in the full forgiveness of sin, pardon from our willfully disobedient nature that separates us from our creator.  Jesus (who committed no sin) gave His life for us (who are sinful) to completely satisfy the wrath of God.  Instead of suffering the appropriate consequences for our actions, Jesus paid the price with His life and enabled us to reunite with God.  Through the death of Jesus – the public, ghastly and humiliating death of Jesus – we are declared forgiven and allowed entrance into the heavenly realms.

This is wonderfully good news, but there’s more.  We are also offered reconciliation with one another.  As Paul wrote:

For he himself is our peace, who has made the two groups one and has destroyed the barrier, the dividing wall of hostility, by setting aside in his flesh the law with its commands and regulations.  His purpose was to create in himself one new humanity out of the two, thus making peace, and in one body to reconcile both of them to God through the cross, by which he put to death their hostility.   Ephesians 2:14-16 (NIV)

Before Good Friday, all people were separated by a wall of hostility into two camps – those who were under God’s covenant and those who were not.  This separation is a symptom of our sin and caused people then, as it causes people now, to divide one another into two distinct groups: us and them.  We like us and we hate them.  Today’s divisions are no longer about rabbinical interpretations of Old Testament law, but of gender and politics and class and ethnicity.  The cross has destroyed the dividing wall of hostility.

Rejoice today that we are reconciled with our Creator and with our fellow-created through the cross of Jesus Christ.  We need never be alienated from God or from our neighbor because of Christ’s sacrifice on Good Friday.  When we stand before the cross today, literally or figuratively, let us all remember that through His death we gain peace with God and unity with all those who stand beside us.   I pray you will accept His offer of reconciliation and receive the peace that passes all understanding.

I wish you all a happy and healthy Easter.

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There’s No Need to Fear! Underdog Is Here!

I am sure that some of you are not basketball fans, let alone college basketball fans.  To be honest, I am, at best, a casual observer of the college game.  However, every once in a while something happens on the court that makes it beyond the sports update and into the ‘regular’ news.  Such an occurrence happened last Thursday when the University of Maryland – Baltimore County Retrievers defeated the University of Virginia Cavaliers in the NCAA men’s basketball tournament.  The win marked the first time a 16-seed (the lowest seeding that the tournament gives) had ever defeated a 1-seed in the tournament (there had been 135 previous match-ups over the past 34 years).  Ultimately, that is where the good news ends, as two days later the Retrievers exited the tournament with a loss to Kansas State.

There is just something about the underdog, the long shot and the dark horse: that competitor thought to have little chance of winning a fight or contest.  Our human nature roots for David as he battles Goliath and cheers for Buster Douglas as he contends against Mike Tyson.  We want to believe that in any fight anyone could win.  We want to live in a world where the little guy could catch a break and beat the big guy at his own game.   Even if it has never happened before, a major league baseball team could win a playoff series even when it is down three games to none and a nation football league team could win the championship even when it is down by 25 points with little more than 17 minutes left in the game.  We all want to live in a world where anything is possible.

In so many areas of life, you and I are the underdog.  Cancer is the 1-seed and we are the 16-seed with little chance for victory.  Poverty has a three-game lead over us and we remain winless.  Sin is ahead by 25 points and time is running out.   All is not lost, however, as we can rest in the promise of our Lord in scripture:

Jesus looked at them and said, “With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.”  Matthew 19:26

“…With God all things are possible.”  Not inevitable, but possible.  Not probable, but possible.  With God, anyone can enjoy victory over any seemingly undefeatable thing.

This weekend we enter Passion Week as the church, the eight days leading up to the world-changing victory of Easter over a previously unbeatable foe.   I hope that you will engage with the body of Christ as Christians of every tradition observe the misunderstood and vastly underestimated challenger enters the court in Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, share in the pre-contest meal with his teammates on Maundy Thursday and participate in the main event on Good Friday.  I hope that you will rejoice with others as we celebrate the devastating defeat of the previously undefeated sin and the once all-conquering death.   Join us, as a local church or as the universal representation of God’s kingdom, as we declare that ‘with God all things are possible’, that the tomb is empty and the slate is wiped clean.  The underdog, the least and the lowest, will one day be victorious.

‘I Am’ in Good Hands

Today is Good Friday, the day in which the Church remembers and reflects upon the death of Jesus.  Each year, I focus on one of the gospels as they relate the events of Palm Sunday through Easter.  This year I have been reading through Luke’s account of the Lord’s final days and am struck by what the good doctor states is Jesus’ final utterance (and arguably His “famous last words”): “Father, into your hands I commit my spirit.”  In saying this, He is quoting from Psalm 31:5 and restating the assurances that David made of God about a thousand years before the cross. 

From the context of Psalm 31:5, I do not believe this is a simple statement of resignation, as if Jesus is saying, “I give up”.  Rather, it is a statement of confidence in the Father.  Psalm 31 tells us that David saw his strength as coming from the knowledge that God is his refuge, deliverance, rescue, rock and redemption.  It is in light of all this that David places all that he was, every aspect of himself beyond his physical existence, in the hands of God.   Similarly, this is the same confidence that Jesus expresses from the cross.

This phrase is akin to the words that Jesus spoke in the garden a few hours earlier, “… not My will, but Yours be done.”  It conveys the confidence that Jesus had in knowing that the plans of God and the guiding hand of God can be trusted.  As the agony of the cross began to overwhelm the limits of His human body, Jesus doesn’t give up, but rather gives over control of His existence to the only one who can perfectly accomplish God’s will, the Father himself.  And He is faithful, releasing Jesus from His mortal coil and redeeming us, lost sinners, from the power of death and sin.

Into your hands I commit my spirit; deliver me, LORD, my faithful God.  Psalm 31:5

Jesus called out with a loud voice, “Father, into your hands I commit my spirit.”  When he had said this, he breathed his last.  Luke 23:46

I pray that I’d have the confidence that David expressed or that Jesus exhibited.  Sadly, I often see the opposite dynamic at work:  when the going gets tough, I want to take matters into my own hands.  Instead of committing my spirit into God’s hands, I futilely attempt to handle my trials and troubles myself.  Instead of acting like David (who just prior to committing his spirit to God asks Him to “keep me free from the trap that is set for me”), I am more likely to stumble into danger by relying on my own sense of direction.  How much pain could be avoided if I committed my spirit to His hands.

It is hard to see the empty tomb when we are enduring what, for us, seems to be the cross.  It is at those times that we need to trust the hand of God, which comforted the Lord, rolled away the stone and raised the Savior.  It is also the hand that can comfort, strengthen and save us.

I am praying that you have a blessed Good Friday and a Happy Easter.

Good God

“The soldiers twisted together a crown of thorns and put it on his head.  They clothed him in a purple robe and went up to him again and again, saying, ‘Hail, king of the Jews!’  And they slapped him in the face.”    John 19:2-3 (NIV)

There is an old adage that is still heard occasionally: “They were adding insult to injury”.  I don’t know if it came from this passage of Scripture, but it could have.  After the Lord was painfully scourged by the Roman lictors (I will spare the reader the gory details), they proceeded to mock and ridicule Jesus.  The charge that the Jewish religious leaders had used for his arrest was treason (he claimed to be king of the Jews), so his abusers ‘treated’ him like a king.  They fashioned a brier crown and forced it upon his head, wrapped him in a robe with royal color and mockingly spoke words of homage.  Instead of kissing his ring, they slapped their hands forcefully across his lips.  And throughout, Jesus said nothing and in no way retaliated.Good-Friday

Why would Jesus act this way?  Surely it is human to retaliate, to return fire and to exact revenge, isn’t it?  We want the guilty to be punished and the innocent to be protected.  Jesus was the innocent one, as Pontius Pilate himself stated that he could find no basis for a charge against the Lord (v.4).  It was the ones making the accusations against Jesus who were the guilty ones (v. 11).  This is not the way life is supposed to work, where one who has done nothing wrong is battered and bruised by those who have done wrong.

So, why did Jesus endure this unwarranted suffering silently?  Truthfully, he did it for us.

“God made him who had no sin to be sin for us, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.”   2 Corinthians 5:21 (NIV)

God heaped all the sin – and the punishment for all the sin – that we have committed on the one who was without sin, Jesus.  The stripe he bore, the bruises he suffered, the mockery he endured and the blood he spilled were the just demands of OUR bad behavior.  He took our sin and suffered; we became his righteousness and rejoiced.

There may be some who read these words and quickly dismiss their significance because, after all, Jesus was God and he knew that he would be raised on the third day.  Before you do that, however, consider how much you would be willing to endure to alleviate the suffering of someone you love.  Would you accept one punch to the face?  Five? One Hundred?  Would you truly lay down your life for another?  Jesus did that and more.  His was not a peaceful drifting into the great beyond, but an excruciating 18 hours of agonizing abuse, all for those who call upon him as Lord and Savior.

No wonder they call today Good Friday.  Like the hymn writer Craig Weigle said, “No one ever cared for me like Jesus”.