Tag Archives: fruit

Seeds and Fruit

When we were vacationing last week, we spent a few hours with our nephew and his family.  As we were walking through their backyard, our niece-in-law was showing us her extensive garden.  She showed us the lettuce and carrots, some of which had been eaten by rascally rabbits.  Then, pointing to some large leaves (which we speculated might have been collard greens or kale), she said, “Those were supposed to be beets, but I think the seeds were mislabeled.”  I admit that I do not have a green thumb, but I have grown a few vegetables over the years; what I know about seeds is simple – that many of them look similar and it is not until you see their growth that you know for sure what they will produce.

This reality has reminded me of two biblical truths, one positive and one negative.  First, the ‘bad news’: Jesus taught his disciples that you don’t pick figs from thornbushes.  Next, the ‘good news’: God’s good creation is designed in such a way that every plant produces fruit according to its kind.

By their fruit you will recognize them.  Do people pick grapes from thornbushes, or figs from thistles?  Likewise, every good tree bears good fruit, but a bad tree bears bad fruit.  A good tree cannot bear bad fruit, and a bad tree cannot bear good fruit.  Matthew 7:16-18 (NIV)

You don’t pick grapes from thornbushes.  You don’t pick figs from thistles.  You don’t plant carrots and get apples.  Cucumber seeds produce cucumbers, even when they are labeled as tomato seeds.  The biblical truth (and agricultural truth) is that you get what you planted, not what you thought you planted.  This is, however, not all bad news.  Some of us, those who were labeled as “stupid” or “damaged” or “worthless”, need to be reminded that our envelope doesn’t determine our end.  We are what we are, not what others say we are.

Every plant produces fruit according to its kind.  The rosebush produces roses.  The pea plant produces peas.  The grapevine produces grapes.  You understand my point.  Even though we might be mislabeled or missorted, we all are capable of producing, and only producing, fruit in accordance with our nature.  When we are properly fed, watered and pruned, we are all beneficial.  This is, unequivocally, good news: God has made you, just as you are, so that you will produce your own particular kind of fruit.  You can do no other task.

Susan’s garden, and the scriptural musings that those plants by the back fence have piqued, have left me with a question: what were you born to do?  Whatever the answer, regardless of the ways you’ve been labeled, cultivate your core and bear fruit accordingly.  Allow yourself to be fed by God over time and develop deep roots.  Creatively pursue the passions of your heart, knowing that the fruit of an apple tree, for example, could be a cider, a sauce or a pie.  The world needs what only you can offer.

The Repurposed Life

As I mentioned in previous posts, my family moved about a month ago, but that is not quite accurate.  In all actuality, we are still in the process of moving.  We are still unpacking boxes, rearranging furniture and repairing window coverings.  Because of the size of the rooms and the placement of radiators and closets, we’ve been faced with making decisions about what we keep, what we shed and what we repurpose.  We have had to determine whether a shelving unit is a better fit in one room or in another.  We have had to experiment with the placement of dishes and bookshelves.

In the process, I have realized a few things: that we are not required to hold onto everything, that many things can have multiple uses and that a few things are non-negotiable.  As we run out of shelf-space, books and baubles that we carried from our previous residence have become donations for the church’s yard sale.  As we assessed our counter-space, kitchen carts were stacked and became an insert for a linen closet.  Along the way, we came across pictures and memory-rich items that we had forgotten we had.  We are removing what we no longer need, reshaping what we have and respecting what we cannot live without.

Our home, a work in progress, reminds me of my own soul.

He cuts off every branch in me that bears no fruit, while every branch that does bear fruit he prunes so that it will be even more fruitful.  John 15:2

This verse from John is a snippet of a longer parable of Jesus which describes a vine, a gardener and a branch.  From this story we know that Jesus is the vine, the Father is the gardener and we are the branches.  We are living in connection to Jesus and the Father is regularly pruning us: we are not the ones who determine what is beneficial in keeping and what we is not, God is.  He is searching our souls and determines what is best lopped off and what is best remaining.

Like our domestic situation, I am convinced that God is continually exploring our living situation and expunging the things that are no longer needed, exposing what will remain and extending our joy.  He is regularly taking away our selfish attitudes and our self-interested motivations.  He is regularly reshaping our spiritual activities and our spiritual gifts.  He is reproducing fruit in our lives, all for His glory.  At the end of the day, He enables us to enjoy the abundant life He offers to all those who accept His pruning.

With the blessing of hindsight, I am sure that old and broken parts of me have been removed by God with the skills of a surgeon, that aspects of my makeup have been reassembled and rehabilitated by God with the skills of a master craftsman, and that I have become more fruitful than I have ever imagined – all through His abiding presence in my life.  As I place and replace the things in our home, I pray I remember the one who dwells in me.