Tag Archives: follow

Done on Purpose

As a church, we have begun the new year by participating in a denominational initiative called “21 Days of Prayer”.  This year our intercessory practices and our focus has been directed by a resource titled Praying the King’s Agenda.  This booklet has helped us hear what Jesus has said to us in His word and then pray about it in humble obedience.  Each day the participants of this program have read a command from the Lord and, after some guided reflection, prayed for a faithful response to that command.

Recently (Day 17 of the program), I was directed to ask help of the one who said, “I will make you fishers of men.”  The daily command of Jesus is found in Matthew 4:19 (“And he said to them, ‘Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men.’”)  Jesus spoke these words to the first of his disciples as he gave them a purposeful direction.   He gave them direction (“Follow me”) and purpose (“I will make you fishers of men”).  He gives us the same direction and purpose.

Most of us are comfortable with the idea that we are commanded to follow Jesus: to walk with him, to stay with him and to submit our plans to him.  This is the first step in any walk of faith.  We are called to accept Jesus as our Lord.  We may not all heed the command, but we all can understand it.

Many more of us are hesitant to embrace the second half of this verse, to acknowledge his purpose for our lives.  We hear about becoming “people fishers” and we shake our heads.  Maybe we have an aversion to fishing or cannot relate to the metaphor.  But I do not think that the significant truth is about the fishing; it is about the making.  We are called to follow so that Christ can make us into what we are: for Peter, Andrew, James and John – who were fishers of fish – it was making them fishers of people; for us – who are accountants, artists, cashiers and coders – it may be making us those professions for God.  This is the second step in any walk of faith.  We are called to follow Jesus toward discipleship.

At once they left their nets and followed him.  Matthew 4:20 (NIV)

As I was directed to pray about this command, I was struck by the response of the initial audience.  They dropped their nets, their livelihoods and their preferences and went after the Lord.  They followed Jesus and, over time, he reshaped their talents, training and abilities into purpose.  Christ desires the same for us; to transform what we are already doing into something more glorious and fulfilling.

This is something the Lord does in us and for us; He will make us what we are intended to be.  Therefore, it is in our best interest that we ask Jesus for help, help to follow and help to surrender.   Those four young fishermen had no idea what wonders awaited them when they went with Jesus.  Neither will we, unless we follow him and allow him to make us more than we can imagine.

Do You Follow?

I would say that I am an avid follower of the Boston Red Sox.  I watch the games (typically on television) and listen to all levels of commentary from sports radio.  I worry when the bases are loaded with Yankee base runners and cheer when the team pulls it out in the ninth.  I offer suggestions for lineups and complain about roster moves.  I use “we” and “us”, not “they” and “them”; I have been known to say such things as “we are going to the playoffs” and “the bullpen lost us the game”.   I may call myself an avid follower of the Red Sox, but I am not.  I am simply a fan.

Merriam-Webster defines a fan (actually, a fanatic) as ‘a person who is extremely enthusiastic about and devoted to some interest or activity’.  That is what I am as relates to the Red Sox.  Whatever the outcome might be of a single game or the entire season, my life and livelihood are never disrupted.  I will never get a million-dollar contract after a great year or cut after a poor one.  I need not save the date for the day I ride through Boston at a Duck Boat parade.  Alex Cora, the field manager, and Dave Dombrowski, the general manager, are never going to ask my opinion or consider my suggestions for the team.  I am not part of the “we”; I am not one of “us”.

Some of us have a similar sense of ‘following’ Christ as we do ‘following’ a sports team:  we can attend the game, or not; we can have strong opinions about how things ought to go, but they amount to nothing more than talk show fodder;  I can say that I am a part of the team, but never put on a uniform or play my position.  I do not attend the team meetings or do the conditioning work in the off-season.  Sometimes we act as if all we want is the glory based upon the sacrifice of another without having to do anything more than watch when I feel like it.  We mistake following Christ as nothing more than being a fan of God’s only begotten.

Then Jesus said to his disciples, “Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me.”   Matthew 16:24

So, are you a fan of Jesus or an actual follower?  Jesus had a completely different conception of “following”.  When we follow Jesus, it means a denial of self.  We must be willing and able to refuse ourselves: our opinions, preferences, schedules and feelings.  Then we are free to accept the Lord’s best for us.  When we follow Jesus, it means taking up our cross.  We must be willing to humble ourselves; certainly the cross of Jesus’ day was an instrument of death, but it was more than that – it was an instrument of dehumanization and disgrace (after all, Jesus could have simply said that we need to lay down our lives, but taking up our cross frames our acceptance of shame for His glory).  Following Jesus will cost us everything.

But we cannot simply leave things there.  Yes, there are costs to following Jesus, and they are dire and deep.  But, as Paul proclaims, the gains of following Jesus are so much greater.  We are shown forgiveness.  We are blessed with adoption.  We are given purpose and hope.  We are equipped to live abundantly.

Follow Jesus, not as a casual fan but as a member of His team.