Tag Archives: consolation

Generation Consolation

During the past few months as we have been at home together, my family has been watching more syndicated game shows than usual.  Many of these shows (e.g. “25 Words or Less”, “Wheel of Fortune” and “Jeopardy”) grant to the non-winners what is commonly referred to as a ‘consolation prize’, a parting gift given with the intention of lessening the blow of losing the game.  These gifts might be as small as a gift certificate to Lobster Gram® or as substantial as a few thousand dollars.   After thirty minutes of hard work, it is good to know that no one walks away empty handed.

“Consolation” is an interesting word to me.  It is derived from a Latin prefix and root combination which originally meant ‘to soothe with” (the prefix ‘con’ and the root ‘solari’, from which we get the English word solace).  In our cultural context, consolation is the comfort we receive by others after a loss or disappointment.  When we offer consolation, we are giving someone else – either with words or actions – something like a balm or a salve in order to lessen the sting of loss.   Consolation, in my mind, is somewhat akin to applying aloe vera to a bad sunburn.

During this pandemic, I have received consolation from an unlikely source: the book of Jeremiah.  Jeremiah is called “The Weeping Prophet” by biblical scholars due to all the difficulties he encounters while serving God.  For the past two months, we have been discussing this book of the Bible during our on-line study and we have read about Jeremiah being mocked, beaten, dropped into a muddy well to die, imprisoned and impugned.  Most of the book recounts hardship after hardship for our messenger of God.   However, during this litany of crushing disappointments, there is a section (chapters 31-33) that commentators call “The Book of Consolation”.

“The days are coming,” declares the Lord, “when I will make a new covenant with the people of Israel and with the people of Judah.”  Jeremiah 31:31 (NIV)

Because of their disobedience and disregard for God, the people of Jerusalem were about to be displaced by the Babylonians.  Because of their sin, they were going to suffer.  But this suffering would only be for a season (albeit an extremely long season of seventy years).  The coming generations would be restored and renewed.  God promised through His word.  The people would return to Jerusalem and God’s blessings would be reinstated.  “The days are coming….”

We, too, can be consoled and soothed with the reality that “the days are coming” when God will make all things right.  The good news for us is that the new covenant has already been made, through the blood of God the Son, so that all who call upon Him in faith shall be saved.  The good news for us is that God has begun the process of restoration by allowing us the opportunity to be in good relationship with Him, through Christ, and that He who has begun this good work will be faithful to complete it.   May we all find consolation in that, even though we may be also enduring disappointment and loss.