Tag Archives: 1 Corinthians 13:11

Childhood

Our baby turns ten this weekend.  Our youngest, our last, our smallest is growing up and before we know it, he will be a young man.  I wonder how much longer we have before he is an adolescent.  How many more times will we walk home from school (me on the sidewalk and Josh on the retaining walls) and he will use a stick as a sword?  How many more unsolicited hugs will my wife and I receive?  How many more nights will he choose to wear Minions© pajamas?  Having been through this process of watching my child grow up three times before, I know that when the ‘last time’ for all these activities will come, and we will not recognize what is happening or what we will be losing.

I still have time.  Josh still wants toys and games as gifts for his birthday and Christmas.  He still likes to color and play board games (frequently asking to have a F.G.N. – family game night).  But one day all that will have changed.  It will not happen overnight, but one day it will all be gone; the snuggling, the wild imagination and the carefree play will be replaced with tacit acknowledgment, pragmatism and smart phone usage.  So, this week I will celebrate my youngest child’s childhood.  We will have a party (with cake and ice cream) with games around his chosen Pokemon© theme, and we will appreciate our boy.

When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child.  When I became a man, I put the ways of childhood behind me.    1 Corinthians 13:11

I have to admit that I have a tough time accepting the reality that my children are getting older.  I still worry (just a bit) when one of my children is not at home.  I still want to offer fatherly advice and get a laugh from dad jokes.  I still want the unsolicited hugs and the early morning raids into my bedroom.  They are my kids, even though they are 23, 20, 17 and (on Sunday) 10.

So, excuse me if I encourage my youngest to continue to wear the one-piece pajamas that are too small.  Forgive me if I let him sit in my lap in the recliner as we watch Wheel of Fortune (and let him think that he solved one of the puzzles before me).  Apologies if I laugh at his jokes, which may have been shared three (or three hundred) times before, as if it were the first time I had heard them.  Mea culpa if I let him swing that stick (or rake or bat or broom) and allow him to pretend for a while.  Let me say, for just a little longer, “He’s just a boy.”

Before I know it, my youngest son will be a man and the days of childhood things will have passed.  That is not a day I look forward to seeing anytime soon.  Happy 10th birthday, Joshua.

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