Small Wins

It has happened again; God has allowed those around me to repeat a recurring theme through interactions I have had over the last 7 days.  I heard it first during a denominational meeting when a speaker encouraged me to ‘shrink the win’.  I heard it again while attending a virtual retreat as a facilitator asked me to reflect on ‘small places of growth’.  I heard it for a third time when I had lunch with a few colleagues when one of the participants commented on ‘the small victory’.  I heard it lastly at our prayer meeting when one of our intercessors reminded us of God’s ‘little blessings’.  God has been orchestrating my engagement with others as a means to focus my attention off the major problems of life and onto the (many times) minor peeks of sunshine.

God has been asking me to adjust my perspective.  In the days since the stay-at-home order was issued in the Commonwealth, much of the news and statistics about my region have been horrible.  The pandemic has exposed us to a great deal of death, damage, and dysfunction within our communities.  I in no way want to diminish the pain or loss that so many have suffered since March.  But I also do not want to make the mistake of seeing the last 220 days as filled entirely with bad news.  There is some light in the midst of this whelming darkness that is visible to those who are looking for it.

Because of the Lord’s great love we are not consumed, for his compassions never fail.  They are new every morning; great is your faithfulness.  I say to myself, “The Lord is my portion; therefore I will wait for him.”  Lamentations 3:22-24 (NIV84)

What are these glimmers of hope, these baby steps of growth, these small victories and little blessings about which God has been speaking to me?  This seasons-long quarantine has afforded the globe to be home with just a little more than television and internet, and this, in turn, provided the disparities of life to be displayed.  The world was watching, and many good people were pressed to action.  Medical inequity was broadcast and many responded with donations of PPE and calls to address the needs of inadequate care in nursing homes and among the poor.  Racial injustice was then captured on cellphones and many were outraged to the point of demonstration and a long-delayed dialogue about race began to rise.  Economic hardship gripped many and so neighbors helped neighbors with what they could share.

Many of us have spent time with the people we love, learned new skills or enjoyed new hobbies.  Many of us, because of the mild and dry weather, walked more and dined more on the sidewalks of our city squares.  The church went out digitally to the world instead of asking the world to come out to church.  We learned to adapt, to adjust and to practice mercy.  We made signs to appreciate the sacrifices of those who risked and shared tears with who lost.  We grew in compassion and care for one another.  Small victories.   

I am still praying that this pandemic is over soon, but until then, I am choosing to embrace the reality that there can be great warmth and light from a dumpster fire.

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