Raising an Ebenezer

Part of my preparations for celebrating Christmas this year is that I have been reading the novella A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens.  While I have seen the films and adaptations on television (my personal favorites are Mr.Magoo’s Christmas Carol and Scrooged), I had never read the relatively short story of Ebenezer Scrooge and the three visiting Spirits.  On the page or on the screen, the plot is well-known:  Scrooge is a successful business owner with great accumulated wealth who is inundated with charitable requests as Christmas approaches; as returns home on Christmas Eve, he is visited by the ghost of his business partner and then three Christmas Spirits; these Spirits show Scrooge his Christmases  past, present and yet to come; these visions have a profound effect on his miserly and calloused heart.

We are all tempted to be a bit like Ebenezer Scrooge at Christmas.  We also receive a barrage of demands for our time and our finances and our kindnesses to care for those with pressing needs.  We might be inclined to think only of ourselves and not about our fellow man and woman.  We might need to be reminded of what is more important than earthly gain.  But where can we find three Spirits on such short notice?

There is another character in Dickens’ novella that serves as a contrast to Ebenezer Scrooge: Bob Cratchit.  Cratchit is Scrooge’s clerk and he is all that Scrooge is not; despite his lack of material resources, he is generous and kind.  Cratchit has his reasons for cynicism – a terrible boss, an insufficient income and a sick child – but he is continually focused on others.  Cratchit is the one who goes to church and he is the one who prays for his heartless boss.  He is the one who carries within himself the joy of Christmas despite having several reasons for the contrary.  While Scrooge was the one who was converted to compassion, Cratchit was continually kind.

This being said, A Christmas Carol is more of a moral fable than a spiritual allegory.  In Dickens’ tale, Christmas is the setting, not the story.  None of us are as hardened as Scrooge and none of us are as virtuous as Cratchit.  All of us can be more compassionate and all of us can share more joy.  Instead of comparing ourselves to a archetypal fictional miser or milquetoast, we are better suited to reflect the character of real individuals.

The shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all the things they had heard and seen, which were just as they had been told.  Luke 2:20 (NIV)

These shepherds were, in many ways, like Scrooge – driven by their vocation to sacrifice most relationships, they accumulated wealth and were ostracized by society.  But one day they received a message from God and that transformed their hearts and lives.  They were changed by the good news of great joy that a savior had been born, and after seeing the Christ child, returned to their workplace with gladness in their hearts.   When they saw (when we see) the great gift we have been given, we shout, “Glorious” – how glorious is our God, His creation and His plan for each one of us to care for each one of us.

One response

  1. ​Two of my favorite TV Christmas movies also!!

    Always regarded A Christmas Carol a morality tale and a good one at that. Wonderful imagery!

    ________________________________

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