O Little Town

On Wednesday night, a group of us from the church walked down the hill to the Ashmont T station and sang carols for the commuters.  While we were there, I could not help but notice that Ashmont station is a hub of activity.  There were people using every form of transportation: cars, cabs, busses, trains, bicycles and walking.  There was a steady stream of busy people, some rushing past our makeshift choir and others lingering for a moment but ultimately moving onto other matters.  And there were so many noises: car alarms, public address announcements, stray musical sounds and digital voices from cell phone speakers. 

Yet, in the midst of all the hustle and bustle, there we were, proclaiming the joy, hope, peace and love of the Savior and handing out candy canes to those who would take them.  As Philips Brooks wrote 150 years ago, “Yet in thy dark streets shineth the everlasting light….”  While the rest of the neighborhood was moving about, accomplishing the things of their “To Do” lists, we were being used by God to provide a gentle reminder of the reason we celebrate.  Above the din of humanity, the soft sounds of the baby born in the manger, the angels and Magi who visited, and the good tidings for all people could be heard.

In those days Caesar Augustus issued a decree that a census should be taken of the entire Roman world.  (This was the first census that took place while Quirinius was governor of Syria.)  And everyone went to their own town to register.  So Joseph also went up from the town of Nazareth in Galilee to Judea, to Bethlehem the town of David, because he belonged to the house and line of David.  Luke 2:1-4

Is our experience at the Ashmont T station a few nights ago what it was like in Bethlehem all those years ago?  While it is unclear how many were living in Bethlehem at the time of Jesus’ birth (some scholars suggest as few as 300 or as many as 1,000), the biblical account of the events that occurred in Bethlehem are clear: so many people flooded this small village outside Jerusalem because of a governmentally decreed census that living space was at a premium.  There were travelers, noises and activity aplenty and few, if any, stopped to notice the world changing couple that came to town.   The urgency of the moment overwhelmed the importance of the advent, the appearing, of the Savior of humankind.

We, too, can get wrapped up in all that still needs doing that we overlook what has been done.  We need to purchase gifts, wrap gifts, bake cookies, consume wassail, attend parties, visit family, connect with friends, worship on Christmas Eve, stuff stockings and settle down for a long winter’s nap.  We can, like subway commuters and census participants, lose track of what is important as we engage in the things that are urgent.  I pray that, in the midst of all the people, noise and activity of the next few days, you hear the angels’ song and delight in the birth of our Lord.

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