Teasures in the Snow

When you spend more than twelve hours on the road, driving from Maryland to Massachusetts, you have a great deal of time to think.  Because of the weather conditions last Saturday, our 382 miles trip took much longer than I anticipated.  It was a challenging and stressful drive over snowy and slushy highways.  The satellite radio and the DVDs from Redbox© made the travelling a bit more bearable while I focused on the road ahead.  Throughout the journey, my thoughts turned to lessons about life and living, some superficial and some profound.snow17

The first lesson I learned was that I ought not trust forecasts.  We live in a society saturated in information, including phone apps that will show you live weather radar and predictions for storm patterns.  As we were anticipating our trip home from Jeanine’s brother’s funeral, I watched and listened to meteorologists in Baltimore (via television) and Boston (via phone app) predicting that the storm was expected to move beneath us and travel out to sea before blowing into Massachusetts via the Cape.  New Jersey, Westchester County and Western Connecticut were supposed to be spared more than a dusting.  No such luck was to fall upon us.  The computers were wrong and the storm took a more western course, forcing us to face light but accumulating snow every minute of our trip.  Experts are not always correct.

I also learned that there are times, rare but right, that staying with others while disregarding the letter of the law is the proper course of action.  Most of the highways we traveled (The New Jersey Turnpike, Garden State Parkway and Interstates 87, 287, 84 and 90) were three lanes in either direction.  In the worst of conditions, these throughways became two sets of ruts travelling along the divided white lines.  At times there was a series of 15 or so cars, all moving at 45 mph, all illegally crossing over their lanes and maintaining the safety of the roads.  Obedience to the law is not always best.

There is a way that appears to be right, but in the end it leads to death.   Proverbs 14:12

The biggest lesson I learned was that I could stand to be more humble.  Early on in the process, I made the decision to return to work on Sunday.  We made our plans based on my choice to be home Saturday night.  Throughout our time away I saw weather reports and I remained resolute.  I received texts from people in the church advising me to reconsider and I remained resolute.  My wife wanted me to change our plans and I remained resolute.  I unnecessarily risked everything to show that I was right, but I was wrong.  I feel that needs to be stated again: I was wrong.  I was proud.  I have since apologized to my wife and children for my arrogance.  I am not always right.

Thank God that we, despite my own foolishness, arrived safely at home.  In hindsight, I should have listened to those around me, led by the Spirt, instead of listening only to myself.  There was a way that appeared to me to be right, and it certainly could have led to disaster.   I am fortunate that I had the opportunity to learn these lessons and not harmed by the consequences of my unwise haughtiness.  Let’s hope that you and I can all learn from my stupidity.

Advertisements

One response

  1. Mike —

    Interesting blog.

    I do not equate, however, your decision to what is normally considered arrogance (Obama), imperiousness (Obama) or self-righteousness (Obama) for the situation was of a much lower magnitude of disruption in the scope of possible issues. Maybe a callous disregard for potential consequences but never stupidity for you also understood that the result of your decision could very likely be success … which occurred. And the potential dangers possibly faced were mitigated by related support systems.

    Nice thoughts though and worthwhile for many readers.

    Best regards,

    Frank

    ________________________________

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: