A Great Gift

A number of years ago I gave a small group of men who attended Calvary a book as a gift.  We were about to study its themes and thought it would be a nice thing to hand out this inexpensive resource.   One of the men, who will remain nameless, asked me as I gave him one, “How much do I owe you?”  I simply said that he owed nothing, that it was a gift.  “I can’t accept that; I can buy my own,” was his reply.  Later on, I found out that he had, in fact, ordered his own copy of the book and paid for it himself. gifts

It was a small thing, but the ramifications of that interaction have remained with me.  As we enter into another gift-giving season, I am thinking about the difference between a gift and an acquisition.  We, as human beings, acquire things from many sources – some things are inherited, some are purchased, some are salvaged and some are made.  A few things we acquire are given as gifts, an extension of someone else’s kindness toward us.  Most acquisitions are practical, secured in one fashion or another based upon necessity.  Gifts are relational, received unsolicited based upon generosity.

“And in their prayers for you their hearts will go out to you, because of the surpassing grace God has given you.  Thanks be to God for his indescribable gift!”  2 Corinthians 9:14-15

As we approach Christmas, we have a choice: Do we accept God’s gift of grace, best demonstrated through Jesus, as an unsolicited expression the Creator’s kindness or do we attempt to acquire this immeasurable resource by any other avenue?  Are we willing to receive a gift (an outpouring of the relationship God desires to cultivate with us) or not?  Are we able to see that the incarnation of Christ at Christmas is an indescribable gift?

The New Testament records a number of gifts that have been given by God, including the gift of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:38), the gift of life (1 Peter 3:7) and a myriad of spiritual gifts (1 Corinthians 14:1).  It seems foolish to me to reject the offer that the Almighty has made or, looking at the Savior resting in the manger, ask of God, “How much do I owe you?”  The wise among us know that there is no such thing as compensation for a gift, for it is an expression of unmerited favor restoring a relationship we cannot repair with our own power or at any price.

Imagine that there is a present, simply wrapped, beneath your tree with an announcement accompanying its arrival stating that the gift is for you.  Don’t say that you cannot accept it because you have nothing to give in return.  Don’t say that you will pay for it and in so doing reject the gift.  Don’t say you don’t deserve it because a gift, by its very nature, is undeserved.  Accept the gift of Christ – and with Him the forgiveness of sin, eternal life, spiritual guidance and the hopeful peace of reunion with the Father.  Who wants a gift they could buy for themselves, anyway?

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